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shale

(Daniel Acker/Bloomberg)

Analysts: Oil patch will come roaring back to life in 2017

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But the remainder of 2015 and all of 2016 will be “wastelands of low oilfield cash flows, spending and general activity levels” as oil prices hover below $60 per barrel.
David Green, software architect, is shown at Baker Hughes, 11211 FM 2920 Road, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015, in Tomball. ( Melissa Phillip  / Houston Chronicle )

Service companies see re-fracking as new opportunity

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Re-fracking can be up to two-thirds cheaper than drilling a new well, which is an alluring possibility for cash-strapped U.S. producers who are straining to keep operational costs down and drilling operations intact.
Anadarko Petroleum Corporation CEO Al Walker, gives a speech after his company won top ranked large employer during the Houston Chronicle's Top Workplaces Awards Gala, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, in Houston. (Nick de la Torre/Houston Chronicle)

Anadarko CEO: Outlook still uncertain for shale comeback

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Earlier in the year, before initial declines in service costs, Anadarko had estimated it would take $3 billion in capital expenditures to keep production levels flat. Now, Walker said, it would take about $2.7 billion, and there is still room for improvement.
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BHP Billiton makes $2.8 billion writedown in Texas shale

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BHP’s announcement comes at a time when U.S. shale is suffering because of low prices for natural gas and oil, the latter of which is hovering near $52 a barrel.
A rig works in the Barnett Shale. (Enervest)

Methane leaks in Barnett Shale vastly higher than EPA estimates, study shows

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“Nobody had any idea how much methane was being leaked in the Barnett area,” said Robert Talbot, an University of Houston atmospheric chemistry professor who authored the paper.
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Study: Refracturing not all it’s fracked up to be

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A large-scale redo of oil wells won’t make sense until companies see better returns from returning to old wells than from drilling new ones, said Christopher Robart, at IHS.
(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Refracking is the new fracking

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America’s tight-oil production is set to peak in 2020, based on U.S. forecasts, but a technique known as refracking could keep output booming for longer by increasing the yield from old wells.
Jeff Allyn, a derrick hand with Raven Drilling, pauses with a cup of coffee while drilling for oil in the Bakken shale formation on July 23, 2013 outside Watford City, North Dakota. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Shale drillers’ safety net is vanishing

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SandRidge, the Oklahoma City-based producer, had about 90 percent of its oil and natural gas liquids output hedged in early 2015, according to a regulatory filing. Next year, the hedges cover less than a third.
(ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images

Speculators retreat from oil as OPEC oversupply crowds out shale

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Saudi Arabia, OPEC’s biggest member, is ready to produce more oil if demand rises, Oil Minister Ali-Al Naimi said June 18. It has 1.5 million to 2 million barrels a day of spare capacity, he said.
The shadows of  workers in the Permian Basin on February 5, 2015 in Mentone, Texas. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The shale industry could be swallowed by its own debt

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The problem for shale drillers is that they’ve consistently spent money faster than they’ve made it, even when oil was $100 a barrel.