EnergyWatch

News from the Houston Chronicle energy team
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Statoil seeks to build huge subsea factories

Norwegian oil and gas company Statoil wants to build huge, underwater “factories” that sit on the seabed as they produce and process gas offshore by 2020.  More »
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Senate takes up energy bill amid Keystone squabble

The 79-20 vote to limit debate on an energy efficiency bill lost much of its significance as the two parties continued to argue over what amendments to allow on the measure, including the pipeline project.  More »
U.S. Congressman from Texas Bill Flores speaks during a panel on the global energy outlook at the 2014 Offshore Technology Conference. (Thomas Shea/Houston Chronicle)

The most unexpected chart you’ll see at OTC

Gamal Hassan, CEO of energy consultants ADH International asked an audience at the Offshore Technology Conference: “What should be the priority for technology innovation?”  More »
Gustavo Hernandez-Garcia, acting director of exploration and production for Meixcan oil giant Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), speaks at the Offshore Technology Conference on Tuesday, May 6. (Marie DeJesus/Houston Chronicle)

Pemex seeking partners for Eagle Ford and deep-water work

The booming Eagle Ford doesn’t stop at the Texas border, but for most producers, it essentially does — at least until now. That will soon change.  More »
(aresauburn/Flickr)

Gulf researchers spot deep-sea creatures living near spill site

Samatha Joye and her team of researchers came back from a nearly month-long excursion to the Gulf of Mexico with a surprising discovery: Aquatic life appears to be flourishing again at the bottom of the ocean near the site of the massive 2010 oil spill.  More »
FMC Technologies displays a subsea tree at the 2014 Offshore Technology Conference. (Collin Eaton/Houston Chronicle)

Next offshore frontier demands breakthrough in subsea technology

Key pieces of the subsea equipment used to gather deep-water oil and gas today wouldn’t last long under the pressures and temperatures of ultra-deep reservoirs that oil companies believe are the next frontier.  More »
eog

EOG Sees Rocky Mountains as North America’s next hot oil field

The company, which is known for quietly building up positions in areas before their potential is widely recognized, said in a statement yesterday that its land in the DJ and Powder River basins in Colorado and Wyoming may hold the equivalent of 400 million barrels of oil.  More »
Waves crash over the drilling unit Kulluk where it sat aground on the southeast side of Sitkalidak Island, Alaska, Jan. 1, 2013. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class/Jonathan Klingenberg.)

Poll: What’s the oil and gas industry’s biggest challenge?

The offshore oil and gas industry knows challenge well. What do you think is the biggest challenge for the business?  More »
The OneSubsea exhibit booth at the 2014 Offshore Technology Conference. (Collin Eaton/Houston Chronicle)

OneSubsea wants to shrink its footprint — and recover more oil

OneSubsea is adding a twist to its two-decade old subsea pumps that may save operators from spending billions to build surface facilities many miles offshore.  More »
(stockyimages)

Sabine Oil to merge with Forest Oil

abine Oil & Gas LLC, an energy producer backed by private equity firm First Reserve Corp., agreed to merge with Forest Oil Corp. in an all-stock transaction to create one of the biggest operators in East Texas.  More »
Former astronaut Mike Bloomfield is vice president of space systems at Oceaneering.

Former astronaut sees ties between space, deep sea

Mike Bloomfield, a former astronaut who heads Oceaneering’s work on space systems, discusses how a longtime NASA lab can be used to improve oil and gas companies’ offshore performance.  More »
Survival Systems International life boat on display at the 2014 Offshore Technology Conference. (Ryan Holeywell/Houston Chronicle)

The one cruise you don’t want to take (photos)

They’re cramped and they’re slow, but if you ever find yourself on one one of Mark Beatty’s vessels, chances are you’ll be breathing a sigh of relief despite the unpleasant conditions.  More »