Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., left, and Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, right, listen as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Poll: Republicans clash with voters on oil industry priorities

A new survey shows likely voters favor more renewable energy and slashing U.S. dependence on foreign oil — not the Keystone XL pipeline and crude exports.
A crew in 2012 lowers a section of pipe into the ground with cradles near Winona, Texas. (AP Photo/Tyler Morning Telegraph, Sarah A. Miller)

A Keystone Veto: Punitive and Unnecessary

As the Washington Post clearly pointed out, the Keystone XL pipeline should never have been as issue in the first place.  Continuing to debate the safest, most technologically advanced pipeline in world history is unsupportable based on all the facts. Using KXL as a bargaining chip, would be just another example of the Administration’s inability […]
Categories: Keystone XL
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks about energy at the Heritage Action for America 2014 Conservative Policy Summit at the Heritage Foundation in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Cruz to push crude exports

Sen. Ted Cruz is set to offer a proposal to lift the 40-year-old crude export ban, despite skepticism from both critics and supporters of the trade restrictions.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (2-L) speaks to the media after the Republican policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol, January 7, 2015 in Washington, DC. Leader McConnell spoke about various issues before the Senate including the Keystone Pipeline. Also pictured is (L-R), Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY) Sen. John Thune (R-SD), Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO), and Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX). (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

On Senate’s to-do list: Keystone, climate change, crude exports

The Senate is gearing up to debate a host of energy industry priorities to start 2015.
House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio strides from the House chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015, after the House overwhelmingly passed a bill authorizing the Keystone XL oil pipeline which would carry oil from Canada to Gulf Coast refineries. The bill passed on a 266-153 vote, one of the first pieces of legislation considered by the Republican-controlled Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

House passes Keystone XL bill

The 266-153 House vote came just hours after a Nebraska Supreme Court ruling left intact the pipeline’s proposed route through the state and ahead of Senate debate set to begin Monday on an identical bill.
President Barack Obama arrives at TransCanada's pipe yard in Cushing, Okla., in 2012. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Nebraska ruling upholds Keystone XL route

The ruling now shifts attention to the nation’s capital, where the State Department, Congress and the White House all are playing a role in deciding whether TransCanada Corp. wins a permit to build the $8 billion border-crossing pipeline.
Senator Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska (Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg)

Senate panel approves Keystone XL bill, despite veto threat

The 13-9 vote to approve the measure — with West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin the lone Democrat crossing party lines to back the bill — paves the way for Senate floor debate to begin as soon as Monday.
U.S. Senator John Cornyn speaks to the audience at the GOP election night party in Austin on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. (Kin Man Hui/San Antonio Express-News)

Could negotiation end Keystone XL showdown?

Sen. John Cornyn suggested Wednesday that GOP lawmakers and President Barack Obama could find a middle ground on the controversial pipeline.
Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., left, and Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., right, listens to a reporter's question during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, where they discussed  their plan to introduce legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline project. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

White House: Obama won’t sign Keystone legislation

The comment came after Sens. John Hoeven and Joe Manchin on Tuesday introduced legislation to approve Keystone XL, formally kicking off the latest congressional push to authorize the pipeline.
Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.   (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Democrats plan Keystone XL counterattack

Republicans are planning an all-out blitz for the Keystone XL pipeline, but Democrats are vowing a vigorous defense.