Why abundant energy resources are a problem for next president

 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, and Republican presidential candidate Donal Trump in these 2016 file photos. Young people across racial and ethnic lines are more likely to say they trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump to handle instances of police violence against African-Americans. But young whites are more likely to say they trust Trump to handle violence committed against the police.   (AP Photo)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, and Republican presidential candidate Donal Trump. (AP Photos)

In June of 2008, the last time there was an open race for the White House, this is what the Energy Department said the new president would face: domestic oil production near historic lows, increased use of coal to meet electricity demand, slow adoption of renewable power, and a deceleration of the natural gas boom.

That forecast turned out to be largely wrong, a reminder of how dramatically the energy landscape has changed since Senators Barack Obama and John McCain contended with oil prices above $140 a barrel and debated polices summarized as “all of the above” and “drill, baby, drill.” For the first time in decades, the next president, whether Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, will enter office amid an abundance of energy resources, with growing supplies of oil, natural gas, and, renewable power.

Read the full column by James Osborne at HoustonChronicle.com to see how that abundance will challenge the next president.

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