Renewable power generation grew 7 percent in Texas last year

 

Morning light shines on an old windmill and several 285-feet-tall wind turbines at the BP Sherbino Mesa II Wind Farm in Fort Stockton, Texas. (Michael Paulsen / Houston Chronicle)

Morning light shines on an old windmill and several 285-feet-tall wind turbines at the BP Sherbino Mesa II Wind Farm in Fort Stockton, Texas. (Michael Paulsen / Houston Chronicle)

Electric generation from renewable sources increased 7 percent in 2012 in Texas, according to the latest figures from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas.

The council, which operates the power grid for most of the state, reported that energy from renewable fuel sources reached 33.9 million megawatt-hours, up 7 percent from 2011.

The vast majority of that — more than 32.5 million megawatt-hours — came from wind power.

Solar power had the largest rate of growth, jumping from just 36,580 megawatt-hours in 2011 to 133,642 megawatt-hours in 2012.

One megawatt-hour is roughly the amount of power consumed by an average home in a month, according to the council, which is also responsible for managing the state’s electric market to ensure power is available when it is needed.

Other types of renewable energy included in the tally include hydropower, biomass and landfill gas. Each generates more power than solar but is dwarfed by wind power in the state.