The back-and-forth on global warming

Lately, the debate over climate change has swung heavily in favor of those who believe in it, that man-made pollution is putting the globe on the edge of calamity. From the apparent inevitability of federal climate change legislation to the parade of energy companies saying “the debate is over,” skeptics seem to have been on the losing side.

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What’s it going to be? By fire …. (AP Photo/The Lufkin Daily News, Joel Andrews)
snow_cleveland_plain_dealer
… or ice? (AP Photo/Cleveland Plain Dealer)

Could it be industry is gathering its strength to swing the pendulum back the other way?
The Heartland Institute held a week-long conference in New York earlier this month, with 500 attendees and dozens of speakers.
General Motors Vice Chairman Bob Lutz (one who is never shy about speaking his mind) calls global warming a “total crock of sh*t.”
And on Thursday the National Association of Manufacturers and the American Council for Capital Formation will release an analysis of the costs of the Lieberman-Warner Climate Change Bill, the bill that currently represents Congress’ deepest thinking on regulating greenhouse gases.
You want to bet the study will say it will be really expensive?
From the press release announcing a conference call on it:

“Conducted by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the independent study examines the implications of the legislation with respect to future energy costs, economic growth, employment, production, household income and the impact on low income earners. The study includes a comprehensive national economic assessment, as well as separate and specific overviews of the impact the legislation would have on all 50 U.S. states.”

Of course, it should hardly be a surprise regulating green house gases will be expensive. The U.S. Energy Information Administration has already said the bill alone would likely increase our electricity prices by 25 percent by 2030, at least.
The results should be available online at 8:30 am CT at either www.accf.org or www.nam.org/climatechangereport.

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