Texas No. 11 for energy efficiency, No. 1 for CO2 emissions

The home of Big Oil doesn’t do as badly as one might expect when it comes to energy efficiency, according to a report released today by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.
Past versions of the ACEEE Scorecard ranked states on utility-sector energy efficiency spending only. This year the report expands the criteria to include eight energy efficiency policy categories:

energyefficiency
How can you illustrate ‘efficiency’?

1. Spending on Utility and Public Benefits Energy Efficiency Programs
2. Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)
3. Combined Heat and Power (CHP)
4. Building Energy Codes
5. Transportation Policies
6. Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards
7. Tax Incentives
8. State Lead by Example and Research & Development
The top 10 states, based on combined scores, are:
1. Vermont, Connecticut, and California (tie)
4. Massachusetts
5. Oregon
6. Washington
7. New York
8. New Jersey
9. Rhode Island, Minnesota (tie)
… and then Texas. The full report can be downloaded here.
Texas doesn’t do well when it comes to spending by utilities on efficiency, getting only 2 out of a possible 15 points on the report’s rating system. But it gets all five points for Energy Efficiency Resource Standards, which is “… a market-based mechanism that encourages energy efficiency by requiring utilities to meet electric and gas energy savings targets.” We wrote about the existing program in Texas most recently here.
Texas also got 4 out of 5 points for Combined Heat & Power (also known as co-generation which uses waste heat from industrial process to generate power — here’s a link to a group promoting this in Texas) and 4 out of 5 for Building Codes. The state gets 0 for Appliance Standards and Tax Incentives.
Also, last week the Associated Press released their analysis of the latest Department of Energy data on state-by-state carbon dioxide emissions. Texas is tops on this list. Here is a story we ran on our site.
Just a reminder, CO2 isn’t considered by itself to be hazardous the way mercury or other items that come out of power plant smokestacks. It’s just that too much of it has been found to increase Earth’s temperature, so there’s a big push to limit the output of the stuff. Here are the states ranked by total carbon dioxide emissions with No. 1 being the highest pollution level. In parentheses are the states’ total carbon dioxide emissions in million metric tons. Each metric ton is 2,204.6 pounds.
1. Texas (670)
2. California (389)
3. Pennsylvania (271)
4. Ohio (266)
5. Florida (244)
6. Indiana (235)
7. Illinois (230)
8. New York (214)
9. Michigan (185)
10. Louisiana (179)
11. Georgia (168)
12. North Carolina (146)
13. Kentucky (143)
14. Missouri (137)
15. Alabama (136)
16. New Jersey (124)
17. Virginia (123)
18. Tennessee (120)
19. West Virginia (114)
20. Wisconsin (105)
21. Oklahoma (103)
22. Minnesota (102)
23. Colorado (90)
24. Arizona (89)
25. Massachusetts (87)
26. Kansas (80)
27. South Carolina (79)
28. Iowa (79)
29. Maryland (79)
30. Washington (79)
31. Wyoming (63)
32. Arkansas (62)
32. Utah (62)
34. Mississippi (62)
35. New Mexico (58)
36. North Dakota (51)
37. Alaska (45)
38. Nevada (43)
39. Nebraska (43)
40. Connecticut (42)
41. Oregon (40)
42. Montana (33)
43. Maine (23)
44. Hawaii (22)
45. New Hampshire (21)
46. Delaware (17)
47. Idaho (14)
48. South Dakota (14)
49. Rhode Island (11)
50. Vermont (7)

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